Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

Nikki

Born in the late 80s, when video-gaming was beginning to make its presence felt, Nikki snubbed them in favour of books. A passion sated by regular trips to the library and boot sales. Writing stories swiftly followed, inspired by – well, mainly by the woodland, talking animals and fairies (blame Beatrix Potter and Victoria Plum). And quite frankly, the less said of those, the better.

Having graduated from university, Nikki has pottered through a variety of jobs and has decided that teaching is probably not for her. Currently working as a part-time receptionist, she tries to shoehorn in her reading, reviewing and writing with a yen for running, yoga, green tea, knitting, sewing and blogging. So there is very little time to think about what she actually wants to do with her life beyond “writing or theatre.”

Answers on a postcard please.

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Editorial Policy

The views expressed in the articles and reviews on Vulpes Libris are those of the authors, and not of Vulpes Libris itself.

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)
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