Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

The Incident of the Poem at the Festival

It wasn’t my fault. I was eight years old, a natural mimic and I always did as I was told. The only thing I remember about the whole affair is the … Continue reading

May 19, 2017 · 2 Comments

Vulpes Random: On marking a poetry exam

I collect my share of the poetry exam scripts, put them in my bike pannier, and cycle home. I put them on the table, close my laptop to avoid distracting emails, find … Continue reading

May 18, 2017 · 1 Comment

Poems from Oby, by George MacBeth

A few weeks ago I shared here my discovery that the tiny settlement of Oby in the Norfolk Broads had a dual literary heritage – the setting for Sylvia Townsend … Continue reading

May 15, 2017 · 2 Comments

A Norfolk Literary Crossroads (a Vulpes Libris Random)

Sylvia Townsend Warner’s novel The Corner That Held Them (which I love with a passion – though it does divide opinion, as Bookfox Simon will attest) is set in the … Continue reading

March 27, 2017 · 4 Comments

The Jewel. A novel of the life of Jean Armour and her husband, Robert Burns, by Catherine Czerkawska

A couple of years ago, out of the blue, I was invited to play a part in our village Burns Supper. What a village in deepest, darkest Surrey was doing … Continue reading

November 9, 2016 · 2 Comments

Manawydan’s Glass Door (d’apres David Jones, 1931) by Heather Dohollau

This is a new poet to me and one I was happy to discover. Though born in Wales, she moved to France as a young woman and lived the rest … Continue reading

July 13, 2016 · Leave a comment

Vulpes Revisited: A Rebel Among Outlaws – Kris Kristofferson

June 13, 2016 · 3 Comments

Coming Up on Vulpes Libris

Today’s fox ought to be the elusive Thought Fox, as you will see, and here s/he is – a midnight fox, if not leaving footprints in the snow. It’s a … Continue reading

April 17, 2016 · Leave a comment

We Refugees by Benjamin Zephaniah

When I was reading some new poems recently, I was struck by how this one showed the universality of people displaced from their homeland. The news reports make refugees into … Continue reading

September 23, 2015 · 6 Comments

Brand New Ancients by Kate Tempest

Poetry is not, usually, my thing. This feels like a terrible confession from someone with both undergraduate and postgraduate literature degrees, but there we are. I’m a novel gal. I … Continue reading

September 2, 2015 · Leave a comment

Coming Up This Week

It’s the last week of summer. In the U.S., the new school year has already begun and that always signals that autumn is here, even if the sun is still … Continue reading

August 30, 2015 · Leave a comment

A poem found on the Road to Nowhere – Norman Nicholson’s ‘Rising Five’.

Millom in Cumbria was once a rural community with a scattered population that relied heavily on farming and fishing to scratch a living. All of that changed forever in the … Continue reading

May 12, 2015 · 5 Comments

Poetry Week on VL

Welcome to Vulpes Libris’ 7th Annual Poetry Week! We continue our tradition of spotlighting an often under-appreciated literary form. This year’s spring time salute ranges from rural life to Shakespeare … Continue reading

May 10, 2015 · Leave a comment

Sharing Poetry

About a year ago, I joined a book group – after years of resistance. When it comes to reading, I am still a bit of a stroppy teenager, instantly resistant … Continue reading

December 4, 2014 · 5 Comments

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)