Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

A Norfolk Literary Crossroads (a Vulpes Libris Random)

Sylvia Townsend Warner’s novel The Corner That Held Them (which I love with a passion – though it does divide opinion, as Bookfox Simon will attest) is set in the … Continue reading

March 27, 2017 · 4 Comments

This week on Vulpes Libris …

I don’t know what’s happening – meteorologically speaking – anywhere else on the planet, but at the moment as far as Scotland is concerned, the sky is a beautiful shade … Continue reading

March 26, 2017 · 5 Comments

Interview with Mick Jackson

In the first of a series of author interviews over the next few months Sam talks to Mick Jackson about The Widow’s Tale, Norfolk, home-made speed cameras, Holbein prints, widowhood, … Continue reading

April 14, 2010 · 3 Comments

The Widow’s Tale by Mick Jackson

Over Easter Megan and I took a trip to the Norfolk coast, to Cromer and Wells and then back down through Walsingham to our beautiful medieval city of Norwich. Along … Continue reading

April 12, 2010 · 7 Comments

The Corner That Held Them, by Sylvia Townsend Warner.

More nuns. 14th century English ones, this time. I hope that’s not too many nuns in one month, but I couldn’t get my very positive recollection of this novel out … Continue reading

January 29, 2010 · 10 Comments

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)