Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

A Man of Genius by Janet Todd

“A Man of Genius portrays a psychological journey from safety into obsession and secrecy. It mirrors a physical journey from flamboyant Regency England through a defeated Europe struggling to create … Continue reading

June 15, 2016 · 3 Comments

Naomi Novik’s Temeraire

Dragons are tricky beasts to fit into historical novels. Naomi Novik’s excellent 2006 novel Temeraire (in the USA, His Majesty’s Dragon), about the fighting dragons of His Majesty’s Navy during … Continue reading

September 22, 2014 · 5 Comments

Troy Chimneys, by Margaret Kennedy

Troy Chimneys is a novel I have loved from the very first time I read it. It has taken me a long time to decide to review it here. I … Continue reading

July 17, 2013 · 10 Comments

The Madness of Queen Maria by Jenifer Roberts

Nowadays we think of Portugal as a pleasant vacation spot, but in centuries past, it was a major player on the world’s stage. This biography covers a pivotal time in … Continue reading

March 8, 2010 · 5 Comments

The Mathematics of Love by Emma Darwin

The word ‘math’ gives me a brain freeze, so the title The Mathematics of Love made me hesitant and I imagined a romance between calculus professors. Happily, this is not … Continue reading

February 12, 2008 · 15 Comments

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)