Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

Jim Carruth’s Killochries

This is a poem to be read in an evening, a novella in half-lines of sparse words, of how a young man’s life gets changed because his mum Lizzie sends him … Continue reading

May 11, 2015 · 3 Comments

Foxes in Literature: Guest article by Simon Thomas

Guest article by Simon Thomas, of Stuck in a Book. Thank you so much for my lovely welcome last month, foxes and all!  I shan’t be quite so split-personality today … Continue reading

April 10, 2013 · 11 Comments

The Fox Woman by Kij Johnson

When I got this book out to reread, I was surprised to find it marked “sci fi”. It’s not sci fi, rather magic realism, as much as any Gabriel Garcia-Marquez … Continue reading

October 11, 2010 · 5 Comments

Interview with a Fox: Moira

As an Occasional Fox, I only enter the Vulpes Libris den long enough for a quick sniff around before I’m off again foraging in bins and making screeching noises, so … Continue reading

November 1, 2008 · 11 Comments

Interview with a Fox: Leena, founder of Vulpes Libris

We thought you might like to know a little more about the people behind the site, so we will be running a series of short interviews with the foxes starting … Continue reading

October 5, 2008 · 11 Comments

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Editorial Policy

The views expressed in the articles and reviews on Vulpes Libris are those of the authors, and not of Vulpes Libris itself.

Quoting from Vulpes Libris

You are very welcome to quote up to 100 words from any article posted on Vulpes Libris - as long as you quote accurately, give us due credit and link back to the original post. If you would like to quote MORE than 100 words, please ask us first via the email address in the Contact details.

Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)