Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

Coming Up on Vulpes Libris

Daffodils mean Spring, and it seems to be a wonderful year for them – such a show they are putting on everywhere. Today’s image therefore says Spring to me – … Continue reading

March 19, 2017 · Leave a comment

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass – by Frederick Douglass

He who proclaims it a religious duty to read the Bible denies me the right of learning to read the name of the God who made me. He who is … Continue reading

March 17, 2017 · 1 Comment

A Line Made By Walking, by Sara Baume

This is the second novel in my 2017 challenge to read a work of literary fiction every month by a novelist new to me; this one is a little late, … Continue reading

March 15, 2017 · 2 Comments

Of The Arts: The Violinist of Venice & The Improbability of Love

A VL Classic, originally posted March 2016. The Violinist of Venice by Alyssa Palombo At first this appears to be a routine historical romance, but it soon deepens to something … Continue reading

March 13, 2017 · 1 Comment

Coming Up This Week

In my area of the world, grey winter skies and occasional snow flurries linger, making me long for flowers and trees with leaves. Maybe that’s why I’ve been paying more … Continue reading

March 12, 2017 · 2 Comments

Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis

Since the U.S. election, I’ve noticed people seem to have been reading certain classic novels, perhaps out of an impulse to connect today’s events with themes in such books as … Continue reading

March 10, 2017 · 2 Comments

The Danish Girl (film)

May contain spoilers. There are movies which have a particular look to them, drenched in color, such as the greenish grey of The Libertine or the golden hues of The … Continue reading

March 8, 2017 · 2 Comments

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

Dana is a twenty-six year old black woman living in California in 1976. She is married to Kevin, who is white, and who rejected his racist family to marry Dana. … Continue reading

March 6, 2017 · 2 Comments

Coming up on Vulpes Libris

March is here and so is the Spring! Well, it hasn’t quite reached Oxford if the rain lashing against my window this morning is anything to go by. While we’re … Continue reading

March 5, 2017 · 3 Comments

Owen Archer mysteries by Candace Robb

One of the periods I like to read about most is the Middle Ages. No, not that time in your forties when you’re no longer young, but don’t yet qualify … Continue reading

March 3, 2017 · 2 Comments

The House on the Strand (or: my struggle with historical fiction)

Oh dear. It seems that I always volunteer myself as the contrary voice for Vulpes theme weeks – or, at least, that’s what I did back when I was just a … Continue reading

February 28, 2017 · 14 Comments

The historical fictions that history tells us

The Historical Fictions Research Network had its second conference this weekend, in the splendid surroundings of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, home of the Meridian, south-east London. The Network … Continue reading

February 27, 2017 · 3 Comments

Historical Fiction Week on VL

Historical fiction is the closest thing we have to a time machine. When done right, it can transport you to another time and place as if a history book came … Continue reading

February 26, 2017 · 4 Comments

316 Years Without Us – a Vulpes Libris Random

For many years I have been a trustee of the oldest (probably) public lending library in England. Founded in 1701 as the Reigate Publick Library, it is now known (after … Continue reading

February 24, 2017 · 2 Comments

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)