Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

Shakespeare’s Restless World by Neil MacGregor

If the author’s name sounds familiar, that’s because he also wrote “A History of the World in 100 Objects”. This book is less overwhelming, not just because there are fewer … Continue reading

October 23, 2017 · 7 Comments

Great Shakespeare Actors: Burbage to Branagh – by Stanley Wells

“Technical acting skills can be acquired through training and the application of intelligence, but there is an extra dimension to great acting which transcends and can even defy technique. It … Continue reading

March 4, 2016 · 4 Comments

In Conversation with: Steven Berkoff

Actor, author, playwright and theatre director Steven Berkoff was born in London in 1937. After studying Drama in London and Paris he performed with repertory companies before forming the London … Continue reading

May 26, 2015 · 1 Comment

The Grand Budapest Hotel,

Watching a Wes Anderson movie is like being in a parallel universe. It’s not an extremely different place, as in many sci-fi movies, but one that’s recognizable with types of … Continue reading

February 16, 2015 · 4 Comments

A Soprano on Her Head by Eloise Ristad

Revisiting a VL Classic Right-side-up reflections on life and other performances Seems a bit silly to review a book about musicians’ mental blocks and performance anxiety on a book blog; … Continue reading

July 18, 2014 · 1 Comment

Shakespeare in a few deft strokes – a Vulpes Libris Random

I’ve recently had a number of Shakespearian treats in the theatre and cinema and on TV, and was so happy to be introduced to the deliciously funny website of a … Continue reading

March 5, 2014 · 7 Comments

The Astaires: Fred and Adele – by Kathleen Riley

Review by Edward Petherbridge. (I should declare my interest, but I guess readers will know that Kathleen is a friend and collaborator …EP.) I am starting to write this at … Continue reading

November 28, 2013 · 3 Comments

SLIM CHANCES by Edward Petherbridge

I believe this may be a Vulpes Libris first. In the past we have inadvertently – and just once to my knowledge –  had different people reviewing the same book … Continue reading

November 19, 2013 · 1 Comment

Backing Into Light

Until I read this memoir, I only knew of Colin Spencer as a food writer. His cookbook Vegetables has been my completely reliable resource for when I accidentally buy salsify, … Continue reading

September 9, 2013 · 6 Comments

The Shakespeare Thefts by Eric Rasmussen

In Search of the First Folios Six years after Shakespeare’s death,  John Heminge and Henry Condell – two of the actors from his company, The King’s Men – gathered together … Continue reading

June 20, 2013 · 3 Comments

Funky cold Messina …

Among the many translations of Much Ado About Nothing, that into Italian seems the most appropriate. In Italy, love, intrigue and treachery seem fit matters for comedy: Silvio Berlusconi is … Continue reading

November 15, 2011 · 5 Comments

Coming Up:Shakespeare Week

Welcome to Vulpes Libris’ 2nd Annual Shakespeare Week! We have a variety of offerings about The Bard this time, with stage, screen and book versions. We debate the authorship question, … Continue reading

November 13, 2011 · 2 Comments

Slim Chances and Unscheduled Appearances by Edward Petherbridge

 “The portrayal of real life on the stage is too important to be managed without the use of long-practised artifice, magic, imagination, ritual and masquerade …” (Chapter 28:  A Plea … Continue reading

October 4, 2011 · 12 Comments

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)