Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

The Land of the Green Man. A Journey Through the Supernatural Landscapes of the British Isles, by Carolyne Larrington

This enchanting, immensely readable book can be read in several ways: it is a vastly entertaining thematic collection of folktales and fairy stories, perfect for autumn reading at a time … Continue reading

November 10, 2017 · 3 Comments

A hundred years on: Trotsky on 1917

One hundred years ago today, by the old Gregorian calendar that was then still in force, the October Revolution took place. The event is simply too big and complex to … Continue reading

October 25, 2017 · 1 Comment

Shakespeare’s Restless World by Neil MacGregor

If the author’s name sounds familiar, that’s because he also wrote “A History of the World in 100 Objects”. This book is less overwhelming, not just because there are fewer … Continue reading

October 23, 2017 · 7 Comments

Michael Haag’s The Durrells of Corfu

This is an exhaustively researched biography of the Durrell family (Gerry, Larry, Margot, Leslie and Mother, for those who know them from Gerald Durrell’s My Family and Other Animals). It’s … Continue reading

October 13, 2017 · 3 Comments

Birds Art Life by Kyo Maclear

This is a book which almost defies description. It’s a memoir, yes, but that’s only a part of it.There’s lists, anecdotes, quotes from books and movies(but not the usual ones) … Continue reading

October 9, 2017 · 1 Comment

Words Are Stones. Impressions of Sicily, by Carlo Levi

I said earlier in the week that I picked up this book because I was short of sunshine and missing Sicily. I’m not sure now that this was the best … Continue reading

September 29, 2017 · 1 Comment

The Pontius Pilate Project

A week from today, I’ll be starting a new course: an MPhil in New Testament studies. My dissertation project is about Pontius Pilate, specifically his representation in the accounts of … Continue reading

September 25, 2017 · 6 Comments

A is for Arsenic. The Poisons of Agatha Christie

It’s astonishing that this book had not been written before. It’s a study of the poisons deployed by Agatha Christie in a selection of her novels, written by a toxicologist … Continue reading

September 6, 2017 · 3 Comments

Two Journeys, Memoirs by Gabourey Sidibe and Rosamund Burton

Recently I read two books that were quite different; one was a memoir, the other a travel book and I was struck at how they each were accounts of a … Continue reading

August 23, 2017 · Leave a comment

The Aspirin Age, edited by Isabel Leighton

The Aspirin Age was published in the U.S.A. in 1949, four years after the Second World War ended. In twenty-two specially commissioned essays it looked backwards over the decades that … Continue reading

July 2, 2017 · Leave a comment

Coming up on Vulpes Libris:

Temperatures in Spain are climbing again from the unseasonably fresh weather of the last week. Today the mercury will brush thirty degrees centigrade, up from the welcome twenty-three of the … Continue reading

July 2, 2017 · Leave a comment

Farewell to the Horse, by Ulrich Raulff

I would never have chosen this book to read without prompting. I’ve never ridden a horse (the nearest I’ve been to that is a donkey ride at the seaside when … Continue reading

June 28, 2017 · 5 Comments

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)