Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

The General in Winter – by Frances Harris

There’s a fascinating painting hanging in the Drawing Room at Drumlanrig Castle in south-west Scotland, which most of the summer visitors – distracted by the bigger, shinier and more valuable … Continue reading

October 11, 2017 · Leave a comment

Old English with Mandy and Paul of ClickityLit

What Does Þæt Mean?! Ure æghwylc sceal ende gebidanworolde lifes; wyrce se þe motedomes ær deaþe; þæt bið drihtgumanunlifgendum æfter selest. (Beowulf) Old English can seem intimidatingly foreign to the … Continue reading

October 3, 2017 · 2 Comments

Don’t Panic, I’m Islamic. Words and Pictures on How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Alien Next Door

I’d heard good things about this anthology before Vulpes Libris was offered a copy, so I grabbed it. It’s a miscellany from Saqi Books, consisting of dialogues, short stories, art … Continue reading

September 27, 2017 · 2 Comments

The Pontius Pilate Project

A week from today, I’ll be starting a new course: an MPhil in New Testament studies. My dissertation project is about Pontius Pilate, specifically his representation in the accounts of … Continue reading

September 25, 2017 · 6 Comments

Group Post:What We Read on Our Summer Break

Though the Foxes were recently on Summer Break, that didn’t mean we took a break from reading. Goodness gracious, no. Some of us did take some fun trips to exotic … Continue reading

August 28, 2017 · Leave a comment

Two Journeys, Memoirs by Gabourey Sidibe and Rosamund Burton

Recently I read two books that were quite different; one was a memoir, the other a travel book and I was struck at how they each were accounts of a … Continue reading

August 23, 2017 · Leave a comment

Vincent by Barbara Stok

A VL Classic (reposted). As a long time Vincent van Gogh fan, imagine how thrilled I was to find this graphic novel about the last few years of his life, … Continue reading

July 5, 2017 · 5 Comments

The Aspirin Age, edited by Isabel Leighton

The Aspirin Age was published in the U.S.A. in 1949, four years after the Second World War ended. In twenty-two specially commissioned essays it looked backwards over the decades that … Continue reading

July 2, 2017 · Leave a comment

Celtic Mythology by Philip Freeman

In a 1937 letter to Stanley Unwin, J R R Tolkien said he felt a certain distaste for Celtic myths ‘largely for their fundamental unreason. They have bright colour, but … Continue reading

June 26, 2017 · 4 Comments

Nifty Nonfiction: Dreadlocks and Deliveries

Two books on elements of everyday life that I found interesting. Twisted by Bert Ashe This is a memoir about hair. As a person who has had short hair all … Continue reading

June 19, 2017 · 3 Comments

Great Castles by Peter Roberts

At first glance, this looks to be just another coffee table book with pretty pictures. And it is that, but there’s more to it. For one thing, there’s more castles … Continue reading

June 16, 2017 · 2 Comments

A Bright Particular Star – The extraordinary life of ‘Kitty’ Queensberry.

To one side of the fireplace in the White Bedroom at Drumlanrig Castle in Dumfries & Galloway hangs a portrait in an ornate gilded frame. It’s of a simply dressed … Continue reading

June 14, 2017 · 2 Comments

Frank O’Connor: An Only Child & My Father’s Son

I started reading this pair of autobiographies by the Irish short story writer and giant among modern Irish literature, Frank O’Connor, without really knowing much about him. I’d read some … Continue reading

May 29, 2017 · 3 Comments

Transmission and interpretation: the case of Josephus

In studying anything to do with ancient history, the first thing you learn is that the preservation of texts is a haphazard affair. Sometimes the only reason the corpus of … Continue reading

May 12, 2017 · 1 Comment

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)