Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

A Line Made By Walking, by Sara Baume

This is the second novel in my 2017 challenge to read a work of literary fiction every month by a novelist new to me; this one is a little late, … Continue reading

March 15, 2017 · 2 Comments

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

Dana is a twenty-six year old black woman living in California in 1976. She is married to Kevin, who is white, and who rejected his racist family to marry Dana. … Continue reading

March 6, 2017 · 2 Comments

Historical Fiction Week on VL

Historical fiction is the closest thing we have to a time machine. When done right, it can transport you to another time and place as if a history book came … Continue reading

February 26, 2017 · 4 Comments

Vulpes Libris classic: interview with novelist and Virginia Woolf expert, Susan Sellers

I didn’t quite know what to pick for my first Vulpes Libris Classic choice – Simon speaking, by the way – so I thought I’d go through the archive and … Continue reading

February 17, 2017 · 33 Comments

The Unseen World by Liz Moore

‘Ada Sibelius is twelve years old and home-schooled. Her days are spent in a lab with her father Daivd – a computer science professor – and the brilliant minds of … Continue reading

February 10, 2017 · Leave a comment

Giovanni’s Room

I took part in a book pyramid scheme recently. It was a send-it-back, upside-down-tree-connections thing, running through Facebook. My friend D recruited me, so I sent a book to her … Continue reading

February 3, 2017 · 6 Comments

Five “Claudine” novels by Colette

When I was fifteen, I was Claudine. Why not? I was rebellious and had chestnut curls. I read and reread my literary auntie’s lovely copy of Colette’s Claudine at School … Continue reading

February 1, 2017 · 3 Comments

What Makes Us Laugh

In these cloudy days of winter and gloomy current events, sometimes we need not just lighter fare, but something that sends us over the top into glee. The Foxes have … Continue reading

January 30, 2017 · 9 Comments

Golden Hill, by Francis Spufford

This is the first monthly new novelist in my challenge for 2017, and so far, so very good indeed! Golden Hill is a historical novel, set in an unfamiliar period … Continue reading

January 27, 2017 · 1 Comment

Group Post:Reading Resolutions

This time of year, many people make resolutions. You know the regular ones-go on a diet or to the gym, eat healthier, learn a new language, tackle whatever big project … Continue reading

January 11, 2017 · Leave a comment

Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

Probably O. Henry’s best known work, this perennial holiday story doesn’t contain any cute little reindeer or snow people. It’s about a young couple who are trying to find the … Continue reading

December 14, 2016 · 2 Comments

John Scalzi’s Agent to the Stars

Another fine post from guest reviewer Dylan …. For us Americans, with Thanksgiving and Black Friday and Cyber Monday (and any other number of ridiculously commercial pseudo-festive event-days that you … Continue reading

December 7, 2016 · Leave a comment

Autumn – Ali Smith

“All across the country, people felt it was the wrong thing. All across the country, people felt it was the right thing. All across the country, people felt they’d really … Continue reading

November 16, 2016 · Leave a comment

My Brilliant Friend – Elena Ferrante (translated by Ann Goldstein)

I have finally got around to reading My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante. Unless you have been living under the proverbial rock, you will already know that this is the first of … Continue reading

November 2, 2016 · 2 Comments

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)