Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs website

When I discovered this website early in the summer, I was delighted. It was so offbeat, yet educational, that I was intrigued. And best of all it was about dinosaurs! … Continue reading

October 6, 2017 · Leave a comment

Penelope Lively’s Passing On

For most of my life the name Penelope Lively has meant The Whispering Knights, The Wild Hunt of Hagworthy, Astercote and The Ghost of Thomas Kempe, books I reread for … Continue reading

September 22, 2017 · 7 Comments

Sword of Bone by Anthony Rhodes Bretherton Khaki or Field Grey? by W.F. Morris

I was going to write two reviews for these books and then decided to write one instead. Both books, I felt, shared a common theme which, despite their settings – … Continue reading

September 19, 2017 · 2 Comments

Coming Up This Week

This week VL takes on a lofty air as we dive into words, both the use of them in a technical way and the use of them by Masters of … Continue reading

September 3, 2017 · Leave a comment

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

Somewhere in the East Coast of America, in a small town familiar to non-Americans from films such as Hitchcock’s The Trouble with Harry, the survivors of a highly dysfunctional family … Continue reading

August 21, 2017 · Leave a comment

Vulpes Revisited: A Palladian Wreath of Hide and Seek

As sometimes happens in the busy lives of the Book Foxes, life and technology have ganged up on Kirsty to scupper her scheduled review of In a Summer Season. Instead, … Continue reading

June 23, 2017 · Leave a comment

The Sleeper Awakes by H.G. Wells

I always seem to join in the Vulpes Libris Theme Weeks with the caveat that I don’t usually get on with the theme in question – c.f. our weeks on … Continue reading

May 5, 2017 · 2 Comments

May the Fourth be with you

How do I love thee, Star Wars? Let me count the ways …. Yoda’s syntax. Han Solo (always). Chewy can put androids back together again with furry paws. Leia takes … Continue reading

May 4, 2017 · 6 Comments

The Bookshop, by Penelope Fitzgerald

I am very much enjoying exploring a new literary landscape: East Anglia, the land of fens, floods and enormous skies. My exploration started with Sylvia Townsend Warner’s The Corner That … Continue reading

April 28, 2017 · 5 Comments

A Norfolk Literary Crossroads (a Vulpes Libris Random)

Sylvia Townsend Warner’s novel The Corner That Held Them (which I love with a passion – though it does divide opinion, as Bookfox Simon will attest) is set in the … Continue reading

March 27, 2017 · 4 Comments

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

Dana is a twenty-six year old black woman living in California in 1976. She is married to Kevin, who is white, and who rejected his racist family to marry Dana. … Continue reading

March 6, 2017 · 2 Comments

Owen Archer mysteries by Candace Robb

One of the periods I like to read about most is the Middle Ages. No, not that time in your forties when you’re no longer young, but don’t yet qualify … Continue reading

March 3, 2017 · 2 Comments

The House on the Strand (or: my struggle with historical fiction)

Oh dear. It seems that I always volunteer myself as the contrary voice for Vulpes theme weeks – or, at least, that’s what I did back when I was just a … Continue reading

February 28, 2017 · 15 Comments

The gentle joy of R.C. Sherriff

I recently read two novels by R.C. Sherriff in fairly quick succession – The Fortnight in September (1931) and Greengates (1936) – having never read anything by him before; they were the … Continue reading

February 15, 2017 · 10 Comments

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)