Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

Nifty Nonfiction: Dreadlocks and Deliveries

Two books on elements of everyday life that I found interesting. Twisted by Bert Ashe This is a memoir about hair. As a person who has had short hair all … Continue reading

June 19, 2017 · 3 Comments

Great Castles by Peter Roberts

At first glance, this looks to be just another coffee table book with pretty pictures. And it is that, but there’s more to it. For one thing, there’s more castles … Continue reading

June 16, 2017 · 2 Comments

The Tao of Pooh by Benjamin Hoff

No matter how many times I read this book, it’s always a delightful experience. At it’s core, it’s an explanation of a school of philosophy, Taoism. But the way the … Continue reading

June 5, 2017 · 2 Comments

The Art of Rivalry by Sebastian Smee

Upon seeing the title, a prospective reader might imagine a couple of artists having fisticuffs, with paint splattering across the walls.But the sensationalist title belies the meaning the author ascribes … Continue reading

May 31, 2017 · 1 Comment

The Dinosaur Lords by Victor Milan

Technically, this novel would be in the Fantasy category, which IS a genre of science fiction, but since general sci fi is too much ‘men and machines’ for me and … Continue reading

May 1, 2017 · 2 Comments

Legion, the TV series

Since my family was too poor when I was growing up to afford comic books, I never got into them, though I have always read the comic pages in the … Continue reading

April 26, 2017 · 2 Comments

“Daffodils” by William Wordsworth

One of the reasons I like this poem, which you can read here , is because it’s lighthearted. So much poetry is dark and deep, so it’s a lovely surprise … Continue reading

April 3, 2017 · 2 Comments

Victoria, the ITV/PBS series

May contain spoilers and irreverence. The ITV series Victoria recently concluded on PBS in the States and it seems like a good time to organize my feelings about it, which … Continue reading

March 24, 2017 · 5 Comments

Of The Arts: The Violinist of Venice & The Improbability of Love

A VL Classic, originally posted March 2016. The Violinist of Venice by Alyssa Palombo At first this appears to be a routine historical romance, but it soon deepens to something … Continue reading

March 13, 2017 · 1 Comment

The Danish Girl (film)

May contain spoilers. There are movies which have a particular look to them, drenched in color, such as the greenish grey of The Libertine or the golden hues of The … Continue reading

March 8, 2017 · 2 Comments

Owen Archer mysteries by Candace Robb

One of the periods I like to read about most is the Middle Ages. No, not that time in your forties when you’re no longer young, but don’t yet qualify … Continue reading

March 3, 2017 · 2 Comments

The Isabel Dalhousie mysteries by Alexander McCall Smith.

Though the author is better known for his “No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency” line and deservedly so, he has a number of other series, one of which features Isabel Dalhousie, … Continue reading

February 8, 2017 · 3 Comments

Guilty Pleasures

Like many people, I often go through my public library’s catalog and place books on hold. Naturally, they all become available at once and then it’s a challenge to read … Continue reading

January 16, 2017 · 2 Comments

Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

Probably O. Henry’s best known work, this perennial holiday story doesn’t contain any cute little reindeer or snow people. It’s about a young couple who are trying to find the … Continue reading

December 14, 2016 · 2 Comments

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)