Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

Coming up on Vulpes Libris

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How is it December already? I swear it was April five minutes ago. Mind you, I think we’ll all be happy once this ridiculous year is over. In the meantime, we have another varied week coming up for you on Vulpes Libris.

Monday: Kirsty D is inspired by Hidden Figures: The Untold Story of the African American Women Who Helped Win the Space Race.

Wednesday: Guest reviewer Dylan sends us word of the extreme weirdness in John Scalzi’s Agent to the Stars

Friday: Moira says she’ll never look at the OED in quite the same way again after reading Peter Gilliver’s exhaustive account of the creation of the mother, father and granddaddy of all dictionaries.

Image: Fox by Der Robert [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr

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Editorial Policy

The views expressed in the articles and reviews on Vulpes Libris are those of the authors, and not of Vulpes Libris itself.

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Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)
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