Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

Coming up on Vulpes Libris

6804162618_50634ddd91_bWe’re back – replete with chocolate, looking forward to seeing a daffodil (any daffodil at all) and (in my case) basking in the heady warmth of 8deg C – ready with a full week of reviews. With a whole string of theme weeks coming (watch this space!), we’ve made absolutely certain that this week there is no discernible collective train of thought.

Monday: Jackie looks at a few memorable books that she’s read recently.

Tuesday: Kate takes an axe to Harlequin Mills & Boon

Wednesday: We welcome back Guest Fox Simon Thomas, taking time off from his regular blog Stuck In A Book to post his latest piece for Vulpes Libris.

Thursday: Hilary has fun finding out what makes the French seem weird to people across the Atlantic, and wonders if it can help her to understand them from across the Channel, with Sixty Million Frenchmen Can’t Be Wrong by Jean-Benoit Nadeau and Julie Barlow.

Friday: An Anglo-Catholic and a secular humanist walk into a bar… I mean, Kirsty McCluskey and Michael Carley have a serious chat about Rowan Williams’ Faith in the Public Square.

There I was, wondering if I could find an Easter Fox – and I have! I am desolated to have missed an Easter Egg Hunt around London last year, with 200 gorgeous eggs to be found. This one, by Shauna Richardson, Crochetdermy Fox, is no. 71, and was hidden close to St James’s Park. The photo is from MnGyver’s Flickr photostream, and is reproduced here under a Creative Commons licence. Clicking on the photo will load the source page.

4 comments on “Coming up on Vulpes Libris

  1. theodysseyclub
    April 7, 2013

    Here are some daffodils (even at 8° C) — from Benjamin Britten and Robert Herrick (and John Rutter’s Cambridge Singers) — (This nice rendering on YouTube gives the remaining movements in the wrong order, but the Herrick daffodils are just the first minute and a half.)

  2. Hilary
    April 7, 2013

    Thank you, that is really lovely! What a beautiful set of songs by Britten, and wonderfully well-sung. It’s a big Britten year, and I’m looking forward to discovering more of his music than I know and love already – and this is a great start.

    I am exaggerating rather for effect – I do have a handful of daffodils in the garden, including one brave little one that came out weeks ago before the cold really set in and kept the flag flying for spring even when the snow was on the ground.

  3. Jackie
    April 7, 2013

    I forgot about daffodils, but maybe I’ll see some now that it seems to be growing warmer here in Ohio.
    Intriguing fox pic, very unusual, but captures the litheness of wild creatures.

  4. suemoorcroft
    April 8, 2013

    I will be very interested to see what ‘Kate takes an axe to Mills & Boon’ comprises!

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This entry was posted on April 7, 2013 by in Coming up this week, Entries by Hilary and tagged , , .



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  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)
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