Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

The Movie Girl by Kate Lace.

(with a giveaway … read to the end!)

Movie Girl

I was supposed to be reading Ten Days that Shook the World .  I was also, however, in the middle of moving house whilst simultaneously trying to arrange an autumn fundraising fair.  Sorting out my Menshiviki from my Bolsheviki and my Soviets from my Dumas was just more than I could cope with at the end of a long day spent grappling with bubblewrap, parcel tape and elusive folk singers.  What I needed, I realized, was something entertaining and lightweight that didn’t require fierce concentration but at the same time wasn’t going to cause any of my neurons to shrivel up and die.

What I needed, in fact, was the Kate Lace novel that had been on my ‘to read’ pile for an unconscionably long time.  I’d read and thoroughly enjoyed  her previous book, The Chalet Girl, so I knew I was on pretty safe ground unless she’d had a disastrous failure of form.

With a glad cry (or at least a pathetically grateful whimper), I tossed the Russian Revolution aside and immersed myself in a good, old-fashioned piece of escapism.

Gemma lands her dream job of wardrobe assistant with a film company, and is soon measuring up and kitting out one of the world’s most desirable male film stars, the decidedly fit and undeniably scenic Jono Knighton.  Romance, of course, blossoms … but the path of true love is complicated by the inconvenient presence of Mrs Knighton, the once famous, ultra-beautiful, but now fading and temperamental  Rowan Day.

If I said that The Movie Girl was anything other than formulaic, I’d be lying.  You KNOW it’ll all come right in the end.  You KNOW that Toxic Tina in the wardrobe department is going to succeed in her nefarious schemes to unseat Gemma.  You KNOW that Gemma is going to have to suffer and repine a bit.  You KNOW that Jono is going to behave like a dolt (he is a bloke, after all …), but it doesn’t matter.  That’s not the point.  You don’t read a book like The Movie Girl to have your brain messed with.  You read it in order to relax and be entertained and enjoy the warm fuzzies – preferably without feeling you should put a plain brown wrapper on the thing because your little grey cells are going slumming.

Kate Lace has been a successful author for many years now, and it shows in her writing – as does her inside knowledge of the film and TV world.  The Movie Girl is a fast-moving story written with a sure hand and  peopled with believable, fleshed-out characters.  As a bonus, it also offers a fascinating behind-the-scenes  glimpse of the far from glamorous nuts and bolts of film-making.   It even comes up with one or two shrewd insights into human nature.  I was particularly taken with Jono’s rueful little analysis of how he’d ended up  with Rowan in the first place:

Rowan Day in The Good Time Girl.  Rowan Day in The Fun-Loving Female.  Jono could almost see the neon lights shining out, and he’d bought tickets to the show.  That was the trouble with god-damned actors, thought Jono.  You never knew when the play was over …

The Movie Girl is, quite simply, a great read.  Higher praise than that you will not hear coming from me.  Buy it;  read it – or  alternatively, leave a comment indicating that you’d like a chance to win a freebie copy and I’ll enter you in the draw.  Don’t forget to say “Please”.  It won’t make any difference, but we do like to maintain certain standards on Vulpes.  Two copies are on offer,  courtesy of Little Black Dress.  The closing date is Saturday, October 25th.

Little Black Dress.  2008.  ISBN: 978-0-7553-3833-7. 308pp.

29 comments on “The Movie Girl by Kate Lace.

  1. Jenny Haddon
    October 17, 2008

    Couldn’t agree more. I read it on a miserable train journey and it completely changed my mood by the time I arrived.

    Laughed out loud at poor old Jono wandering round his own lifestyle magazine kitchen like an intruder, wondering why they needed all these appliances when all he was ever allowed to eat was salad and wholemeal pasta and they never had guests. You could really see why he fell for Gemma, who was not only fun and kind and sexy but NORMAL.

    Great read.

    (And I don’t need a free copy. I gotit!)

  2. Nora Fountain
    October 17, 2008

    I would love to read Kate’s book so please enter me in the draw.
    Nora Fountain

  3. Lesley Cookman
    October 17, 2008

    What a fantastic review. And I agree completely. (I think I’ve got one on here, too!)

  4. Lorraine Powell
    October 17, 2008

    I loved The Chalet Girl and would really love to win a copy of The Movie Girl – please, (pretty please with chocolate on top!)

    Lori x

  5. Sheila Riley
    October 17, 2008

    I have

  6. Heather Rosser
    October 17, 2008

    I also loved the Chalet Girl and look forward to reading the Movie Girl. It would be lovely to win a copy – please!

    Heather

  7. Sheila Riley
    October 17, 2008

    Sorrry about that folks, slip of the digit.

    I have read The Chalet Girl and The Movie girl and I am looking forward to reading The Trophy Girl as soon as I can get my hands on it.

  8. Henriette Gyland
    October 17, 2008

    Oh, yes, please, please, please! I’d love a chance to win “The Movie Girl” by Kate Lace. I haven’t read “The Chalet Girl”, but I read another one of hers when she was with a different publisher and thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Henriette

  9. Debs
    October 17, 2008

    I was wondering what to start reading from my teetering to be read pile and I think you’ve just given me the answer. Thanks.

  10. Annie Burrows
    October 17, 2008

    Please put my name in the hat to win a copy of The Movie Girl. I have read The Chalet Girl, thoroughly enjoyed it, and would love to read more of Kate’s stories.

    Annie

  11. Sue Moorcroft
    October 17, 2008

    Yes, pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeease, I would like to be entered into the draw. I need cheering up. Thank yeooooooooooooooou.

  12. Jen Black
    October 17, 2008

    I never win anything but this sounds like a good read and I’d love to see what everyone’s talking about. Hopefully yours,,
    Jen

  13. Jane Gordon-Cumming
    October 17, 2008

    Oh please enter me for the draw! I loved ‘The Chalet Girl’ and I’m hugely looking forward to reading this.

  14. Romy Sommer
    October 17, 2008

    I haven’t read any of Kate Lace’s books, but as I work in the film industry I can’t wait to read this one. Now just cross fingers for the draw …

  15. Sarie
    October 17, 2008

    Please put my name in the draw for a copy of The Movie Girl – it sounds fab. Thanks 🙂

  16. Anne Styles
    October 17, 2008

    As one of the insiders I loved the book! And there really are folks like that in the film business!!!

  17. Monica Fairview
    October 17, 2008

    Sounds wonderful! I’d love to be put in the draw for a copy of The Movie Girl.

  18. Kate Lace
    October 17, 2008

    I can’t believe how enthusiastic everyone is. Such a boost, especially as The Cabin Girl (#4 in a series of 6 girls) has come out in a nasty case of middle-book-sag today, which is deeply annoying and irritating and the old morale is a bit low. Well, it was till I read all these comments. Thanks everyone. Maybe I’ll keep on writing after all.

    xxxx

  19. Linda
    October 17, 2008

    This sounds like a fun book to read. Please enter me in the drawing. Thanks.

  20. Carol M
    October 17, 2008

    PLEASE, PLEASE enter me in the draw! The Movie Girl sounds like a great read! Thank you! 🙂
    mittens0831 AT aol.com

  21. Patty
    October 17, 2008

    Hello Moira, I’d like a chance to win a freebie copy. Please, enter me in the draw 🙂

    That book would be perfect for Bluecabochon.

    See you on C19 when Spooks airs? 😉

    Ciao,

    Patty

  22. Yan
    October 17, 2008

    I would love to be entered!

  23. Ceri Evans
    October 18, 2008

    I would love to be entered into the draw for this book, could do with something a bit lighter after The Northern Clemency!
    Thanks, Ceri x

  24. Jackie
    October 19, 2008

    This sounds like a nice bit of fluff.
    Is there really a character named “Toxic Tina”? How funny!

  25. Phillipa Ashley
    October 19, 2008

    Great review – well done kate. I loved the Chalet Girl. And Jackie – not ‘fluff’ please. 🙂

  26. Jodie
    October 20, 2008

    Love little black dress books and just discovered your fab site today. It’d be great if you could enter me in the draw.

  27. Mantelli
    October 20, 2008

    That sounds like fun. I’d like to be entered in the drawing, please!

  28. Amy
    October 22, 2008

    Sounds fantastic! Count me in.

  29. Moira
    October 26, 2008

    Tah-Dah!

    The draw has been made and the winners are ….

    Ceri Evans and Sue Moorcroft.

    I’m emailing you both ladies.

    Congratulations!

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This entry was posted on October 17, 2008 by in Entries by Moira, Fiction: romance, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , .

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