Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

A Norfolk Literary Crossroads (a Vulpes Libris Random)

Sylvia Townsend Warner’s novel The Corner That Held Them (which I love with a passion – though it does divide opinion, as Bookfox Simon will attest) is set in the … Continue reading

Featured · 2 Comments

This week on Vulpes Libris …

I don’t know what’s happening – meteorologically speaking – anywhere else on the planet, but at the moment as far as Scotland is concerned, the sky is a beautiful shade … Continue reading

Featured · 4 Comments

Ladybird Books

  The Museum of English Rural Life is a fantastic small museum. It’s in Reading in the UK (part of the university), and has just reopened its exhibiting spaces after … Continue reading

March 29, 2017 · Leave a comment

Victoria, the ITV/PBS series

May contain spoilers and irreverence. The ITV series Victoria recently concluded on PBS in the States and it seems like a good time to organize my feelings about it, which … Continue reading

March 24, 2017 · 5 Comments

Votan and Other Novels by John James

Paperback covers of the novels from the 1970s and 1980s, when they knew something about illustrations.  How do myths get started? What experiences point people towards explanations that draw from … Continue reading

March 21, 2017 · 1 Comment

Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer by C. S. Lewis

I worked for the Bodleian, in Reader Services, for seven or eight years (part-time), and one thing I noticed was that C. S. Lewis was very popular among visiting American … Continue reading

March 20, 2017 · 5 Comments

Coming Up on Vulpes Libris

Daffodils mean Spring, and it seems to be a wonderful year for them – such a show they are putting on everywhere. Today’s image therefore says Spring to me – … Continue reading

March 19, 2017 · Leave a comment

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass – by Frederick Douglass

He who proclaims it a religious duty to read the Bible denies me the right of learning to read the name of the God who made me. He who is … Continue reading

March 17, 2017 · 1 Comment

A Line Made By Walking, by Sara Baume

This is the second novel in my 2017 challenge to read a work of literary fiction every month by a novelist new to me; this one is a little late, … Continue reading

March 15, 2017 · 2 Comments

Of The Arts: The Violinist of Venice & The Improbability of Love

A VL Classic, originally posted March 2016. The Violinist of Venice by Alyssa Palombo At first this appears to be a routine historical romance, but it soon deepens to something … Continue reading

March 13, 2017 · 1 Comment

Coming Up This Week

In my area of the world, grey winter skies and occasional snow flurries linger, making me long for flowers and trees with leaves. Maybe that’s why I’ve been paying more … Continue reading

March 12, 2017 · 2 Comments

Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis

Since the U.S. election, I’ve noticed people seem to have been reading certain classic novels, perhaps out of an impulse to connect today’s events with themes in such books as … Continue reading

March 10, 2017 · 2 Comments

The Danish Girl (film)

May contain spoilers. There are movies which have a particular look to them, drenched in color, such as the greenish grey of The Libertine or the golden hues of The … Continue reading

March 8, 2017 · 2 Comments

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

Dana is a twenty-six year old black woman living in California in 1976. She is married to Kevin, who is white, and who rejected his racist family to marry Dana. … Continue reading

March 6, 2017 · 2 Comments

Categories

Archive

Editorial Policy

The views expressed in the articles and reviews on Vulpes Libris are those of the authors, and not of Vulpes Libris itself.

Quoting from Vulpes Libris

You are very welcome to quote up to 100 words from any article posted on Vulpes Libris - as long as you quote accurately, give us due credit and link back to the original post. If you would like to quote MORE than 100 words, please ask us first via the email address in the Contact details.

Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)