Vulpes Libris

A collective of bibliophiles talking about books. Book Fox (vulpes libris): small bibliovorous mammal of overactive imagination and uncommonly large bookshop expenses. Habitat: anywhere the rustle of pages can be heard.

Lisa

Lisa Glass is the author of Prince Rupert’s Teardrop, a dark literary detective novel.

FURTHER INFO

Lisa is from Plymouth but now lives in Newquay. She likes animals, eating (but not eating animals – she’s a lifelong vegetarian), surfing, yoga and all types of fiction.

Lisa’s website can be found at www.lisaglass.co.uk; you can read more about Lisa’s new novel there.

For Leena’s Vulpes Libris review of Prince Rupert’s Teardrop, click here.

For Dove Grey Reader’s review of Prince Rupert’s Teardrop, click here.

BOOKS AND AUTHORS WITH WESTCOUNTRY CONNECTIONS

The Method and Other Stories by Tom Vowler.

Ingo by Helen Dunmore.

A Sweet Obscurity by Patrick Gale.

Mondays are Murder by Tanya Landman.

Short Fiction 3. University of Plymouth.

Light Reading by Aliya Whitely. A Soapbox article by Aliya Whitely can be found here.

Rough Music by Patrick Gale.

The Road of the Dead by Kevin Brooks.

The Art of Losing by Rebecca Connell.

A Season of Leaves by Catherine Law.

Here Lies Arthur by Philip Reeve.

Split by a Kiss by Luisa Plaja.

Extreme Kissing by Luisa Plaja.

Victoria Plum books by Angela Rippon.

Medina Hill by Trilby Kent.

The Bones of Summer by Anne Brooke.

Love begins in Winter by Simon Van Booy.

Prince Rupert’s Teardrop by Lisa Glass. Review by Leena.

Categories

Archive

Editorial Policy

The views expressed in the articles and reviews on Vulpes Libris are those of the authors, and not of Vulpes Libris itself.

Quoting from Vulpes Libris

You are very welcome to quote up to 100 words from any article posted on Vulpes Libris - as long as you quote accurately, give us due credit and link back to the original post. If you would like to quote MORE than 100 words, please ask us first via the email address in the Contact details.

Acknowledgment

  • (The header image is from Aesop's Fables, illustrated by Francis Barlow (1666), and appears courtesy of the Digital and Multimedia Center at the Michigan State University Libraries.)
  • Follow

    Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

    Join 808 other followers

    %d bloggers like this: